The Padua Study

CLIENT

James Sullivan, Reverend Thomas J. McDonagh, C.S.C. Associate Professor of Economics, University of Notre Dame

William Evans, Keogh-Hesburgh Professor of Economics, University of Notre Dame

DESCRIPTION

The Padua Study is an evaluation of the impact of a Catholic Charities Fort Worth program designed to help struggling families get back on their feet. The Padua Study began with a baseline phone survey with approximately 250 individuals and families in Tarrant County, Texas who were seeking services from Catholic Charities Fort Worth. Participants who completed a baseline interview were randomly selected for either a control or a treatment group. The Padua Study will follow-up with participants one and two years after their initial baseline interview. The in-person (CAPI) interviews will last approximately 45-60 minutes in length. The study is designed to capture information about a broad range of life experiences. Examples of survey modules include employment, health situation, social support and community, service utilization, and plans and attitudes about the future.

PROJECT DIRECTOR

Kerryann DiLoreto and Jaime Faus

DATE IN FIELD

Baseline Y1: March 2015 - November 2015
Baseline Y2: January 2016 - September 2016
CAPI Y1 1st follow-up: March 2016 - November 2016
CAPI Y2 1st follow-up: Winter/Spring 2016-17 to September 2017
CAPI Y1 2nd follow-up: March 2017 - November 2017
CAPI Y2 2nd follow-up: Winter/Spring 2017-18 to September 2018

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The Post-Adoption Life Study (PALS)

CLIENT

Karin Malm, Senior Program Area Director for Child Welfare and Senior Research Scientist, Child Trends

DESCRIPTION

In 2014, UWSC developed and fielded PALS, the Post-Adoption Life Study. This study assesses well-being and examines challenges that youth face who were adopted through the Wendy's Wonderful Kids (WWK) adoption recruitment program as they transition to adulthood. The study is being conducted in collaboration with Child Trends with funding from the Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption. Over a 4-year period, approximately 350 19-year old youth from across the United States will be interviewed. The in-person interviews are about 90 minutes in length and include Audio-CASI for sensitive questions. The study participants are former foster youth who were in foster care beginning at age 8 or older and were adopted through WWK. Youth will be contacted as early as age 14 and UWSC will keep in contact with youth until they turn 19 and are eligible for the interview.

PROJECT DIRECTOR

Karen Jaques and Kerryann DiLoreto

DATES IN FIELD

July 2014 - 2018

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Expanding STEM Talent Study

CLIENT

Xueli Wang, Professor, Educational Policy and Leadership Analysis, University of Wisconsin Madison

DESCRIPTION

Expanding STEM Talent study is a longitudinal mixed mode web/mail survey of students at UW Colleges, Madison College and Milwaukee Area Technical College. The goal of this study is to investigate factors associated with student transfer from 2-year to 4-year institutions in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields of study. Results from this research will inform 2- and 4-year institutions about STEM learning experiences, program features, and educational practices that matter the most in charting a successful STEM transfer pathway. Students will be surveyed as freshmen and then again on their 2nd and 4th year in college.

PROJECT DIRECTOR

Griselle Sánchez-Diettert

DATES IN FIELD

October 2014 - May 2018

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California Youth Transitions to Adulthood Study (CalYOUTH)

CLIENT

Mark Courtney, Professor of Social Work, School of Social Service Administration, University of Chicago

DESCRIPTION

The California Youth Transitions to Adulthood Study (CalYOUTH) is an evaluation of the impact of AB12, the California Fostering Connections to Success Act, on outcomes during the transition to adulthood for foster youth. CalYOUTH is a longitudinal survey of approximately 800 foster care youth in the state of California. Modeled after the very successful, Midwest Young Adult Study, CalYOUTH seeks to interview youth prior to their 18th birthday at Wave 1, then follow-up at age 20 for Wave 2, and age 22 for Wave 3. In collaboration with the California Department of Social Services, and funded by multiple foundations, CalYOUTH will be conducted over a 5-year period. The in-person interviews are approximately 75-90 minutes in length and include Audio-CASI for sensitive questions, as well as the eMINI. The study is designed to capture information about a broad range of life experiences. Examples of survey modules include foster care placement characteristics and experiences, experience with the juvenile courts, education, employment, health and development, social support and community connections, service utilization, and plans and attitudes about the future.

PROJECT DIRECTOR

Kerryann DiLoreto and Karen Jaques

DATE IN FIELD

April 2013 - November 2018

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The Wisconsin Families Study (WiscFams)

CLIENT

Kristen Shook Slack, Professor of Social Work, University of Wisconsin-Madison

DESCRIPTION

The Wisconsin Families Study is an evaluation of Project GAIN, a program in Milwaukee County funded by the Wisconsin Children’s Trust Fund to assist families in accessing economic resources, reducing financial stressors, and increasing income stability for the children and adults in the home.

UWSC will conduct in-person (CAPI) baseline and 1-year follow-up interviews with about 800 participants, some of whom will participate in Project GAIN between interviews.

The study is designed to capture information about the support and services available to families in Milwaukee County as well as the participants’ experiences as a parent. The interview will last about an hour and some of the topics include: parenting, housing, employment, childhood experiences, economic and social support, and service utilization.

The goal of the study is to determine the extent to which economic support programs reduce child maltreatment and for whom such programs are most effective in an effort to design more effective prevention programming.

PROJECT DIRECTOR

Karen Jaques

DATE IN FIELD

Baseline: February 2016 - June 2016

Follow-up: February 2017 - June 2017

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Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS)

CLIENT

Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction

DESCRIPTION

Every other year, the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), conducts the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) of High School students. The survey is conducted to monitor health-risk behaviors of high school students. These behaviors, in turn, result in the most significant causes of both mortality and morbidity during youth and adulthood. A random sample of Wisconsin High School students will be surveyed in the spring of 2017. The purpose of this survey is to gather responses from a random selection of high school students in grades 9 through 12 in Wisconsin related to various risk behaviors and assets. This information will provide youth reporting on various behaviors for use by DPI, CDC, and other agencies in ongoing and future planning, policy decisions, and operations.

The UWSC will provide project management and administrative support including school recruitment; study-specific recruiter and field staff training; database development for tracking school participation; on-site survey administration; completion tracking; and stipend payment distribution.
UWSC will use a multi-mode process for recruiting schools. Professional field staff will administer the survey, ensuring quality data collection and participant confidentiality.

PROJECT DIRECTOR

Jacek Kraszewski and Kerryann DiLoreto

DATE IN FIELD

September 2016 – May 2017

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Study of Iowa High Schools (SIHS)

CLIENT

Dr. Eric Camburn, Associate Professor, Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis, UW Madison and Dr. Peter Steiner, Associate Professor, School of Social Work, UW Madison

DESCRIPTION

UWSC conducted a pilot study aimed at measuring the impact of the Authentic Intellectual Work (AIW) initiative on teachers and students. Responding to recent calls to reform
secondary education in the United States, the Iowa Department of Education (IDE) adopted the AIW initiative to advance both the rigor and relevance of teaching, as well as the learning outcomes of students in Iowa’s high schools. The AIW program engages teachers and students in intellectual work that reflects three criteria: construction of knowledge, disciplined inquiry, and value beyond school. The pilot study was used to test and improve all field procedures and data collection protocols to ensure final, production effort procedures bring high levels of participation from teachers and students, and high data quality overall.

The pilot study combined an in-¬school data component with Iowa Department of Education warehouse data. UWSC conducted the field activities for the data component in six high schools in Iowa, three that are implementing the AIW initiative and three that are not. The in-school data component has 4 sub-components: teacher web logs, instruction artifacts, student paper questionnaires and parent paper questionnaires. The full study involves the same components with 25 AIW-schools and 25 schools that are not implementing AIW.

PROJECT DIRECTOR

Jaime Faus

DATE IN FIELD

Pilot: Fall 2015 - Spring 2016

Study: Fall 2016 - Spring 2017

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Harvard Second Generation Study (G2)

CLIENT

Robert Waldinger, MD, Professor of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School; Director, Laboratory of Adult Development, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston

DESCRIPTION

The Harvard Second Generation Study (G2) seeks to understand the intergenerational factors that contribute to healthy aging. In the mid-1940s, over 700 young men in Boston participated in extensive interviews about life and health. They were re-interviewed at intervals for over 70 years in the renowned Study of Adult Development. In 2015, funded by the National Institutes of Health, researchers sought to extend this research across generations with the 1,941 biological, step- and adopted children of men in the original study. The study’s long history with the fathers placed it in a unique position to understand the effects that one generation may have on the health of the next generation, and how these effects may vary within a family. Study protocols included a 45-minute telephone interview and a 40-page follow-up questionnaire. Participants became eligible for additional protocols administered at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.

PROJECT DIRECTOR

Vicki Lein

DATE IN FIELD

July 2015 to December 2016

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Longitudinal Study of Generations (LSOG)

CLIENT

Dr. Merril Silverstein, Cantor Professor of Aging Studies, Syracuse University, Maxwell School Department of Sociology, and Falk College School of Social Work; New York

DESCRIPTION

The Longitudinal Study of Generations (LSOG) is a study of 328 multi-generational families that seeks to understand how attitudes and beliefs change over the course of life and are shared across generations. The most recent round of research, funded by the Templeton Foundation and sponsored by Syracuse University and the University of Southern California, focused on religious beliefs, identities and participation. The 1,870 members of the third and fourth generations in the families were invited to participate in a 45-minute web survey. In addition to questions on religion, respondents were asked about relationships with multiple generations of family, about physical and psychological well-being, friendships and work, and opinions and values.

If you recently received an invitation to participate in the Longitudinal Study of Generations, please click here.

PROJECT DIRECTOR

Vicki Lein

DATE IN FIELD

May 2014 to October 2016

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Behavioral Risk Factors Surveillance Study (BRFSS)

CLIENT

Center for Disease Control & Wisconsin Department of Health and Family Services

DESCRIPTION

BRFSS is an ongoing study that is coordinated by the CDC on a national level and the Wisconsin Department of Health and Family Services in the state of Wisconsin. The BRFSS is the largest health study that studies risk factors affecting the health of America. These include the amount of exercise in one's life, one's diet, and the frequency of doctor visits. Monthly, the UWSC performs approximately 334 interviews in the state of Wisconsin.

PROJECT DIRECTOR

Robert Cradock

DATE IN FIELD

Ongoing

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Wisconsin Family Health Survey (FHS)

CLIENT

Department of Health Services, Division of Public Health, Office of Health Informatics

DESCRIPTION

The Wisconsin Family Health Survey (FHS) is an phone survey of 2400 randomly sampled Wisconsin households conducted for the Department of Health Services. The purpose of this annual survey is to collect statewide health information of Wisconsin residents. Oversampling of minority populations and a stratified sampling frame design allow investigators to discern racial and regional trends, among others.

PROJECT DIRECTOR

Chad Kniss

DATE IN FIELD

Ongoing

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The National Youth in Transition Database (NYTD)

CLIENT

Wisconsin Department of Children and Families (DCF)

DESCRIPTION

The National Youth in Transition Database (NYTD) is a federally-mandated evaluation of the use of independent living services by foster youth in Wisconsin and a measure of the state's performance in preparing youth for their transition from foster care to independent living. UWSC conducts a baseline survey of youth in foster care at age 17 as well as a follow-up survey with these youth at ages 19 and 21. Each year, a new cohort of 17-year olds is added to the sample. To encourage participant response, this study is mixed-mode, using web, phone, and mail survey options. UWSC also is in contact with caseworkers to help connect youth to the survey. A component of the mandate is to reach 17-year olds within 45 days after their 17th birthday. UWSC has implemented contact protocols to maximize outreach efforts in this timeframe. UWSC developed an automated sample management and data delivery system to allow new sample to flow to UWSC and data to flow to DCF on a daily basis.

PROJECT DIRECTOR

Karen Jaques

DATES IN FIELD

Ongoing

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PRAMS - Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System

CLIENT

Eleanor Cautley, Wisconsin Department of Health Services

DESCRIPTION

PRAMS is a population-based CDC surveillance system to reduce infant mortality and low birth weight. Started in 1987, PRAMS collects state-specific data on maternal behaviors that will be used for planning and assessing perinatal health programs. In Wisconsin, it is administered through the Wisconsin Department of Health Services. Wisconsin PRAMS surveys a random sample of moms who have had a live birth, stratified by non-Hispanic white, African American, and other race/ethnic groups. The survey asks about maternal behaviors before, during, and after pregnancy. The mail portion of the survey has five waves including an advance letter, a reminder letter, and up to three copies of the survey. If study participants have not completed and returned the survey after two months they are included in a phone follow-up phase to increase response. UWSC has been conducting the phone follow-up to the mail survey for the Wisconsin Department of Health Services since 2007.

PROJECT DIRECTOR

Chad Kniss

DATES IN FIELD

Ongoing

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SYNAR Tobacco Compliance Study

CLIENT

Tana Feiner, Wisconsin Department of Health and Family Services

DESCRIPTION

Under the Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment (SAPT) block grant Synar requirement, every state in the country must conduct annual unannounced random inspections of tobacco retailers to determine the compliance rate with laws prohibiting the sale of tobacco products to persons under the age of 18. To fulfill the Synar requirement, each year the state of Wisconsin contracts UWSC to conduct the Synar study, which involves choosing a random sample of tobacco retail outlets, inspecting the sampled outlets, and then estimating the overall state retailer violation rate based on the results of the compliance checks.

UWSC has been conducting the yearly sample frame creation, coverage studies, and compliance checks for the state of Wisconsin since 2000.

PROJECT DIRECTOR

Jaime Faus

DATES IN FIELD

Ongoing

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WiscAid

DESCRIPTION

WiscAid is a team of researchers committed to understanding the factors affecting student success in college. A better understanding of how much financial aid is needed and the ways aid should be allocated is vital to improving the financial aid system in Wisconsin. The main purpose of WiscAid is to improve financial aid policy in Wisconsin by providing policymakers, financial aid officers, and other decision makers with high quality information on the real impact of aid for financial aid recipients across the state.

College students from across the state of Wisconsin, including undergraduate students enrolled at all 42 two and four-year colleges in both the University of Wisconsin (UW) and Wisconsin Technical College System (WTCS), are participating in WiscAid. This information will be useful to colleges and universities, financial aid providers, and Federal and local policymakers who need to know how to make college more affordable for local students.

PROJECT DIRECTOR

Lisa Klein

DATES IN FIELD

August 2008 - Ongoing

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Chicago Communities Study

CLIENT

Maria Krysan, Kyle Crowder, Michael Bader

DESCRIPTION

UWSC continues to be on the cutting-edge of collaborative interviewing technologies by connecting field interviewer laptops with tablet devices operated by respondents. UWSC successfully piloted an in-person study (WiscMoms) that used tablet devices to display complex family structures to respondents during an interactive interview. Currently, UWSC is developing a two-way interaction between laptops (CAPI interview) and tablet devices (touchscreen maps) for in-person interviews about neigborhood knowledge, selection, and segregation.

PROJECT DIRECTOR

Kerryann DiLoreto

PROGRAMMERS

Chris Schlapper, Eric White

DATE IN FIELD

In Development

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Wisconsin Youth Tobacco Survey (YTS)

CLIENT

Randall Glysch, Tobacco Prevention and Control Program, Wisconsin Department of Health Services

DESCRIPTION

The Wisconsin Youth Tobacco Survey (YTS) is a school-based survey of middle school (grades 6-8) and high school (grades 9-12) students. The survey collects information on youth knowledge, beliefs, and behaviors related to the use of tobacco and vaping products. These state-specific data assist in tailoring tobacco prevention and education programs to the unique and changing needs of Wisconsin’s young people.

The survey is conducted during the spring semester of even-numbered years, in a sample of Wisconsin schools that were selected by the Centers for Disease Control. Within each selected school, a small number of classes are randomly selected to participate in the Wisconsin YTS. The paper self-administered questionnaire includes core questions provided by the Centers for Disease Control and state-specific questions designed by the Wisconsin Department of Health Services.

PROJECT DIRECTOR

Margarete Wichmann, Kerryann DiLoreto, and Jacek Kraszewski

DATE IN FIELD

January 2016 – June 2016

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MIDUS: Midlife in the U.S. National Study of Health and Well-Being

CLIENT

UW Institute on Aging and the National Institutes of Health

DESCRIPTION

In 2013, the Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) National Study of Health and Well-Being started its third wave of longitudinal data collection, contacting nearly 5,000 adults between the ages of 45 and 95 who had been MIDUS participants for nearly 20 years. The primary objective of the MIDUS study was to identify the major biomedical, psychological, and social factors that allow some people to achieve good health, psychological well-being, and social responsibility during the journey through middle life on into the later years. MIDUS 3 included additional questions about the 2008 recession to investigate its effect on health and well-being. MIDUS 3 protocols included a 45-minute telephone interview, a 100+ page mail questionnaire, and a 25-minute cognitive interview via telephone.

In 2011, the UWSC fielded the MIDUS Refresher to replenish the MIDUS longitudinal sample. The MIDUS Refresher used a multi-frame sample design, comprised of age-stratified RDD, cell and age-targeted list sample, to recruit 3500 new participants from across the nation, aged 25 to 75, into the study. The MIDUS Refresher protocols, similar to MIDUS 3, included a 45-minute telephone interview, a 100+ page mail questionnaire, and a 25-minute cognitive interview via telephone. The MIDUS Refresher included a random oversample of 500 African American participants conducted in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, with protocols that included a 2-hour in-person interview, a 50 page questionnaire, and a 25-minute cognitive interview.

PROJECT DIRECTOR

Vicki Lein, Kerryann DiLoreto, and Griselle Sánchez

DATE IN FIELD

MIDUS Refresher: November 2011 - November 2014

MIDUS III: Summer 2013 - 2015

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Wisconsin Longitudinal Study Microbiome Pilot

CLIENT

Pamela Herd, Associate Professor of Public Affairs and Sociology, UW-Madison; Federico Rey, Assistant Professor of Bacteriology, UW-Madison

DESCRIPTION

UWSC conducted a series of focus groups, then launched a pilot effort to collect human microbiome samples, drinking water samples and tests, and a self-administered questionnaire from a subset of Graduate and Sibling participants and their spouses or partners for the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (WLS).

This pilot effort is the first of its kind to better understand the human microbiome and its relationship to health outcomes by partnering cutting-edge microbiology research with a landmark social science dataset. The wealth of data about life experience and health already collected and analyzed by WLS hold immense potential to lead to new findings when combined with research on the human microbiome.

UWSC collected over 400 stool and water samples from Graduates and Siblings, as well as from their spouses and partners. The response rate among the Graduates and Siblings was 70% for the samples, with a 90% cooperation rate for the SAQ.

For more information on the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, please see below.

PROJECT DIRECTOR

Kerryann DiLoreto, Rae Ganci, Karen Jaques, and Ken Croes

DATE IN FIELD

June 2014 - March 2015

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UW-Madison College of Letters and Science Alumni Surveys

CLIENT

John Karl Scholz, Dean of the College of Letters & Science, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

DESCRIPTION

From August, 2014 to January, 2015, the UWSC contacted over 8,000 UW-Madison L&S Alumni to participate in a mixed mode web/mail survey regarding their opinions about their time at UW-Madison, and their current career status as alumni. Two different cohorts of alumni, one who had graduated approximately one year before the survey (N~3,000), and one who graduated 8 to 10 years before the survey (N~5,000), were contacted. Extremely high response rates of 43% and 50% respectively were obtained by UWSC for this important effort to help inform the college’s new career initiative, proving that with careful study design, high response rates to web surveys can be obtained.

PROJECT DIRECTOR

Kelly Elver and Griselle Sanchez-Diettert

DATE IN FIELD

August, 2014 to January, 2015

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The National Children's Study

CLIENT

The National Children's Study Waukesha Vanguard Center

DESCRIPTION

The University of Wisconsin Survey Center acted as the local call center for the Waukesha Vanguard site of the National Children's Study from 2009 to 2011. The NCS is the largest study ever done to examine the effects of environmental influences on the health and development of over 100,000 children nationwide, following them from before birth, to age 21. Seven sites in the U.S., including Waukesha County, were chosen as pilot, or vanguard centers, where study protocols were being launched and tested before the study began in nearly 100 additional representative sites around the country. UWSC was pleased to work with the Waukesha research team, which included the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, and the Medical College of Wisconsin. The call center functions included assisting with the screening and recruitment of women of childbearing age in Waukesha County, as well as conducting follow up interviews by telephone with pregnant women enrolled in the study. As a pilot site, we worked closely with the Waukesha Study Center to navigate the complexities of conducting this federally funded longitudinal study, and to collect high quality data, while maintaining strong relationships with study participants.

PROJECT DIRECTOR

Kelly Elver

DATES IN FIELD

May 2009 - December 2014

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Dictionary of American Regional English Qualitative Data Collection (DARE)

CLIENT

Joan Houston Hall, Chief Editor

DESCRIPTION

From November 2013 to November 2014, the UWSC assisted the Dictionary of American Regional English (DARE), the world-renowned authority on dialectical variation in the United States, with a qualitative data collection effort. The 2013–2014 round of data collection, only the second in DARE’S history, was a pilot study to test the feasibility of collecting qualitative data by web and telephone in place of in-person interviewers. The pilot study was fielded only in Wisconsin.

In its first round of data collection, from 1965 to 1970, DARE interviewers crisscrossed the United States in vans called Word Wagons and conducted interviews with 2,777 people in 1,002 communities. Equipped with paper questionnaires, pencils, and reel-to-reel tape recorders, DARE interviewers identified “key informants,” community members who were knowledgeable about the everyday words used in their regions. The first round of DARE fieldwork, combined with printed citations, resulted in more than 60,000 dictionary entries.

In the 2013–2014 round, the UWSC collaborated with DARE staff to design an innovative web survey that reproduced the “key informant” qualitative methodology of the first round of interviews by allowing respondents to answer questions on topics that they felt knowledgeable about. More than 4,600 people participated in the web survey, providing more than 600,000 responses to questions about word usage in Wisconsin. Forty-two web survey respondents also were selected to participate in a telephone interview that audio-recorded their pronunciation and speaking style.

PROJECT DIRECTOR

Ken Croes

PROGRAMMER

Brendan Day

DATE IN FIELD

November 2013 - November 2014

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Wisconsin Early Childcare Study (WECCS)

CLIENT

Katherine Magnuson, Associate Professor of Social Work and Associate Director of the Institute on Poverty, UW-Madison

DESCRIPTION

The Wisconsin Early Childcare Study (WECCS) is a validation study designed to examine whether child care providers in the state of Wisconsin with higher ratings are better able to promote healthy development and learning. The study began in the summer of 2013, by randomly selecting approximately 160 child care providers serving children in two communities (Milwaukee county and the northeast region of the state). From these providers, approximately 800 three- to five- year olds were randomly selected to participate in the study. Their development and learning was assessed by UWSC field staff twice - in the fall of 2013 and the spring of 2014. Assessments included the 2001 Woodcock-Johnson III, the Bracken School Readiness Assessment (BSRA-3), and the Head, Shoulders, Knees, and Toes (HTKS task). At the same time, site administrators, teachers, and parents were surveyed about individual children's behavior and well-being, as well as their own experiences with the YoungStar child care quality ratings program. Site administrators and teachers were asked to complete self-administered questionnaires. Parents were asked to complete a telephone interview. Spanish language interviews were conducted as needed for both children and parents.

From November 2013 - April 2014, UWSC staff conducted observational site assessments using the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale (ECERS) and the Family Child Care Environment Rating Scale (FCCERS).

PROJECT DIRECTOR

Kerryann DiLoreto, Rae Ganci, and Jaime Faus

DATE IN FIELD

June 2013 - June 2014

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Access to Lung Cancer Treatment Study (ATLC)

CLIENT

Marianna Shershneva, Assistant Scientist, Office of Continuing Professional Development, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health

DESCRIPTION

The Access to Lung Cancer Treatment Study (ATLC) was a telephone interview of lung cancer patients documenting delays in the lung cancer care continuum in Wisconsin and North Carolina. By identifying gaps in the continuum of care for cancer patients, researchers will use study results to develop educational and systems interventions to reduce unnecessary delays.

PROJECT DIRECTOR

Griselle Sánchez-Diettert

DATES IN FIELD

April 2012 - May 2014

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Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (WLS)

CLIENT

Pamela Herd, Associate Professor of Public Affairs and Sociology, UW-Madison

DESCRIPTION

The historic Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (WLS) recently completed a new round of data collection. A first for WLS, interviews were conducted in person. Over 12,000 graduate and sibling participants were contacted for interviews that included cognitive assessments and physical measurements. Interviewers also collected waivers to access Social Security and Medicare records, as well as DNA samples not already given by participants during a previous effort. In addition, participants were asked to complete a 72-page self-administered questionnaire. UWSC achieved over an 80% overall response rate for the in-person interviews.

The WLS is a unique, large-scale longitudinal study of adults and their families that covers more than half a century of life. It is a valuable resource for research on aging, life course, inter-generational transfers, relationships, family functioning, long term effects of education and cognitive ability, occupational careers, physical and mental well-being, and morbidity and mortality.

The WLS began in 1957 with original data collection from 10,317 high school graduates in Wisconsin with subsequent data collection in 1964, 1975, 1992, and 2004. Previous waves consisted of an in-depth telephone interview and a follow-up mail survey with the more than 9600 surviving men and women in the original sample. A parallel phone and mail survey was conducted with 7150 randomly selected siblings of the graduates. A shorter telephone survey was conducted with spouses of graduates and siblings.

In 2007, UWSC conducted a massive biomarker collection for the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study. 8,141 graduates were asked to donate a saliva sample using an Oragene kit and return it by mail. UWSC also successfully fielded a similar biomarker collection effort with the siblings.

Further information can be found here.

PROJECT DIRECTOR

Kerryann DiLoreto, Ken Croes, Jessica Price, Karen Jaques, Rae Ganci, and Griselle Sánchez

DATE IN FIELD

September 2009 - December 2012

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Milwaukee Area Renters Study (MARS)

CLIENT

Matthew Desmond, Junior Fellow, Society of Fellows and Assistant Professor of Sociology and Social Studies, Harvard University

DESCRIPTION

The Milwaukee Area Renters Study (MARS) is an original survey of tenants in Milwaukee's low-income private housing sector. Informed by a yearlong ethnographic study of eviction in inner-city Milwaukee, and funded primarily by The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the MARS study was conducted via in-person interviews over the course of two field periods from fall of 2009 to fall 2011. (A pretest of fifty households was completed in the summer of 2009.) Interviewers visited over 3,000 households, selected from low- and high-poverty neighborhoods and through a multi-stage stratified probability sampling design. The survey collected data on tenants' current housing situation, neighborhood characteristics, civic engagement, material hardship, and social networks. It also compiled a roster for all adults and children in the household. The bulk of the survey collected a two-year residential history from all respondents, who were asked about their previous housing conditions, rental behavior, landlords and building managers, and household rosters. In addition, this housing history module documented the location and number of moves each tenant has made in the previous two years and the reasons for those moves. In sum, the MARS Study collected data on the causes and consequences of eviction, and provided useful information about urban poverty, inner-city neighborhoods, the low-income housing market, and social networks among the poor.

PROJECT DIRECTOR

Kerryann DiLoreto and Jessica Price

DATES IN FIELD

Summer 2009 - Fall 2011

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Midwest Young Adult Study (MYA Study)

CLIENT

Mark Courtney, Professor, School of Social Service Administration, University of Chicago; and Amy Dworsky, University of Chicago Chapin Hall Center for Children

DESCRIPTION

In collaboration with the Chapin Hall Center for Children, the Department of Children and Family Services in the State of Illinois, the Department of Human Services in the State of Iowa, and the Department of Health and Family Services - Division of Children and Family Services in the State of Wisconsin, UWSC interviewed approximately 775 foster care youth placed with foster care providers at Wave 1 in 2002. Roughly 225 youth were interviewed in Wisconsin, 425 in Illinois, and 80 in Iowa. Interviews were about 75 minutes in length and asked about the youth's living situation, closeness with foster care family, schooling, preparation for independent living, drug and alcohol use, and future plans. Sections from the WHM-CIDI were included in the interview. The interview also featured an ACASI (audio computer-assisted self-interview) section for administering sensitive questions about abuse and delinquency.

This longitudinal study involved follow-up rounds of in-person interviews in 2004, when some respondents were leaving foster care at the age of 19, in 2006 when respondents were living independently at the age of 22, in 2008 when many respondents had become parents, and again in 2010. Altogether, the Midwest Young Adult Study spanned 5 rounds of data collection, achieving 80%+ response rates at each wave. Extensive tracing and location methods were employed to track respondents from wave to wave. The results of this study have been used to understand the experiences of foster youth, and how various agencies and programs can address the youth's needs for services and support as they age out of the system and enter adulthood.

PROJECT DIRECTOR

Kerryann DiLoreto

DATES IN FIELD

2002, 2004, 2006, 2008, and 2010

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WI Job Center Evaluation Study

CLIENT

Duane Frisch, Department of Workforce Development

DESCRIPTION

This study was a federally mandated customer service evaluation of services received from Wisconsin Job Centers. This was a CATI survey of 500 businesses and 500 employees who had used Job Center services. Respondents were asked to rate the services they received in order to evaluate how Job Centers responded to their needs.

PROJECT DIRECTOR

Bob Cradock

DATE IN FIELD

Fall 2001 - 2009

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TEAM Study of African Americans with High Blood Pressure

CLIENT

Dr. Bonnie Svarstad, UW Madison School of Pharmacy

DESCRIPTION

The TEAM Study is a longitudinal study of 700 African Americans with high blood pressure living in Milwaukee, Racine, Kenosha, Beloit, or Madison. The study examines the an intervention approach whereby community pharmacists and pharmacy technicians in these five Wisconsin cities help educate patients about their blood pressure, medications and other strategies needed to control blood pressure, and communicate with the patients' doctors when appropriate. The UWSC conducted the second wave (6-month follow-up) using in-person meetings with respondents to measure blood pressure and administer SAQs. Interviews took place in respondents' homes or at their site pharmacy. UWSC achieved over a 90% response rate for this study.

PROJECT DIRECTOR

Kerryann DiLoreto

DATES IN FIELD

March 2007 - January 2009

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