Cold, Hard E-Cash: Distributing Survey Participation Incentives through Mobile Pay Applications

In recent years, the rising popularity of online surveys has led to a new set of challenges for survey researchers, particularly as it concerns the distribution of survey participation incentives. Traditionally, respondents receive monetary incentives via direct mail in the form of cash or check, but this approach poses a problem for members of online samples, whose residential addresses may not be available.

New study indicates poor health — not aging itself — decreases older Americans’ likelihood of voting

University of Wisconsin–Madison sociology professor Michal Engelman led the study, published Oct. 15 in the Journals of Gerontology: Series B, along with sociology graduate student Won-tak Joo, sociology Professor Jason Fletcher and political science Professor Barry Burden.

The study uses data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, which Engelman directs. The WLS has followed more than 10,000 Wisconsin high school graduates since 1957, surveying them about once a decade. In addition to the original participants, the survey has interviewed their siblings and spouses and includes detailed data on wealth, physical and mental health, and a range of social activities.

Longitudinal Study of Generations

UWSC is proud to once again administer the Longitudinal Study of Generations. In this respected multigenerational study, researchers explore the ways family culture is transmitted across generations, and the effects of family life on opinions, beliefs, well-being, friendships, and values. Questions can be directed to Senior Project Director, Vicki Lein. 

Let’s Agree to Disagree! New Publication by UWSC Researchers Recommends Against Using Agree-Disagree Questions

Although they are ubiquitous, a recent publication by UWSC researchers and collaborators calls to question the use of agree-disagree (AD) questions to measure attitudes and opinions. In “Towards a reconsideration of the use of use of agree-disagree questions in measuring subjective evaluations,” UWSC researchers provide a review and synthesis of research on the measurement properties and potential limitations of AD questions.

New Study by UWSC Researchers and Collaborators Explores Differences in How Black and White Respondents Answer Questions about Trust and Medical Researchers

Check out the newly published “Understanding Survey Methodology: Sociological Theory and Applications” for results from a new UWSC study. The study examines how Black and White respondents answer questions about trust in medical researchers and participation in medical research.

New Research from UWSC Client Jenny Higgins and UW CORE on Abortion Health Care Access

Findings from a UW CORE study on how doctors view access to abortion will appear in the December issue of the American Journal of Public Health. With the help of the University of Wisconsin Survey Center (UWSC), the team sent 1,357 surveys to doctors in all specialties and received 913 responses between February and May 2019.

UWSC Senior Project Ken Croes to Co-Present “Conducting Focus Group Research or Stakeholder Activities in the New Virtual World”

UWSC Senior Project Director Ken Croes and Gay Thomas, Director of Stakeholder Engagement with the Wisconsin Network for Research Support, will co-present about online research practices at an upcoming event of the University of Wisconsin Institute for Clinical and Translational Research Community-Academic Partnership Education Program.

Interested in surveying physicians? New UWSC research highlights the effectiveness of $5 and $10 sequential incentive combinations

While collecting high quality data from physicians is critical, response rates for physician surveys are frequently low. A proven method for increasing response in mail surveys is to provide a small, prepaid monetary incentive in the initial mailing. More recently, UWSC researchers have begun experimenting with adding a second cash incentive in a follow-up contact in order to increase participation among more reluctant respondents.